An artisanally crafted blog curated by Cooking Lager for discerning readers of beer bloggery

Monday, 1 November 2010

£1.40


I don’t step into pubs much, and on Sunday I understood why. Every so often, about once or twice a year, I like to step into a pub. Primarily to confirm my pre existing prejudices regarding them as being primarily dumps by and large populated by losers. Well Sunday was the lucky day I decided to support a pub and buy a pint, which should keep them going for the next six months.

Stood outside Next I said “I need to scoot for half an hour to do some man shopping, I’ve got my mobile on me, so text me, yeh?” And off I was to discover the delights of a great British hostelry. I used to think you had to do man shopping to get away with this and return with a bag containing razor blades or something. You can however say "couldn't find what I was after, love"

A Sam Smiths pub was my chosen destination for one and one reason only; they are even cheaper than the Wetherspoons. Pongy old man’s ale is the cheapest grog in there, but grog it is, and as far as pong goes a pint of Old Brewery isn’t half bad. Sam Smiths pubs are a tad on the “traditional” side, if the 1970’s ever becomes a tradition. If a hundred years from now people are knocking up mock 1970’s pubs in the way they knock up mock Tudor and Victorian style dumps (presumably thinking that not only do I fancy a pint, but I fancy stepping back into a bygone era of rickets, wood beams and Sunday night TV drama for said pint), then Sam Smiths are indeed traditional pubs. Not much had changed since my last foray into the delightful world of the working man’s boozer. The usual collection of piss artists, alcoholics & losers. The trick is to buy a newspaper so none of them try and talk to you. A foreign language newspaper is useful as you can then claim to not speak English if that isn’t enough to put them off their propensity for the warm friendliness of the north.

Crikey, though, these publicans are having a laugh. Last time I was in there, six months ago, a pint of Old Brewery was £1.30. Safe to say in the intervening six months the bar staff had not remembered my face and said “Cheapest bitter we’ve got cookie?” So much for “Cheers”, where everybody knows your name. It’s now £1.40 pint. £1.40 a pint? Jesus wept. £1.40 ? Yes £1.40. Jesus H wept. That’s 10p more for what is exactly the same pisswater they were selling for £1.30 six months ago. Now don’t get me wrong, it was a decent pint of grog but robbing bastards. 10p robbing bastards. Thieving rotten robbing 10p bastards. No wonder the pub game is dying if they think they can charge £1.40 a pint. I’m scared to return in six months time, lest it’s £1.50 If I do I’m gonna claim to be a CAMRA member and ask for a discount.

15 comments:

StringersBeer said...

Just a thought, but you do know that your "online persona" is showing signs of an antisocial personality disorder, don't you?

Cooking Lager said...

showing signs? You wanna go to the start of this rubbish. I actually think I'm becoming more sociable. The world of beer bloggers is rubbing off on me. I don't even dislike my friends that much these days.

Meer For Beer said...

Of course they didn't recognise you, you weren't wearing your badge!

ChrisM said...

F*ck me, they have a website - except they don't, it doesn't work. Phew!

So, Turners or Boars, Cookie? Not been in the latter since I worked there - £1.22 a pint in those days (2004), and I remember the outcry when it went up to £1.24!!!

Cooking Lager said...

£1.24 is tempting, but it's not worth a trip to geordie land, why eye.

I can't think of much that's worth a trip to geordie land, thinking about it.

First Stater said...

I used to eat a raw oyster once a year to see if they are an acquired taste. After a few years I came to the conclusion I don't like oysters. I used my learnings from the oysters to prevent torturing my tastebuds with DIPA's, one free sample and I was cured for life. Eventually you will come to the same conclusion about pubs and not need the semi-annual expense.

Curmudgeon said...

It's Brown and Darling you want to blame for the price rises, not Humphrey Smith.

ChrisM said...

Nah mate, this were the days when I lived in Stockport. Only Sam's up here is in North Shields, and it's £1.48! But as Mudgie points out, it's only tax increases that put the price up in Sam Smith's pubs.

Tom Mann said...

You're lucky, I was in a Sam Smiths last night in Chester and I was stung £1.52 a pint. Shocking.

Cooking Lager said...

You have a fair point, Stater. Time for man shopping to involve a can of lout on a bench.

Mudge, I'll blame who I like. I might even blame CAMRA beer geeks for promoting grog as a premium product.

Chris & Tom, £1.48, £1.52? Jesus wept.

The Pub Diaries said...

I expect the increase could be down to their recent propensity for litigation... Snakes in suits don't come cheap. Though as I believe you are on the wet side of the Pennines it probably wouldn't bother you too much.

Meer For Beer said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Meer For Beer said...

£1.99 in London, so count yourselves lucky.

Mark, Real-Ale-Reviews.com said...

Best was still £1.20 at the Angel in Leeds not too long ago. A pub of the most mysterious and eclectic clientèle you could imagine (including none other than Sherlock Holmes himself). Better get there before inflation hits by the sound of things.

Paul said...

Blimey, you're lucky to find beer under £3 in Bournemouth...