An artisanally crafted blog curated by Cooking Lager for discerning readers of beer bloggery

Monday, 27 September 2010

The Pong Report


Doing the rounds of the beer blogs today, it is worth mentioning the much respected and venerable worlds 2nd greatest beer writer after Zak Avery, Pete Brown, and his Cask Ale Report. You can read it all here. Top blogs include Tandy, Woolly and Beer reviews, where all the debate is occurring.

A couple of thoughts spring to mind. It’s not looking good for cooking lager enthusiasm. Pong has 15% of the market now. Crikey, at this rate of decline for lovely lout, Pong will be up to 20% of all beer within 50 years. A feature of arithmetic is that growth from a small base produces a large percentage but ever bigger subsequent increases are required to maintain that growth as the base is reset every year.

Thankfully we are not long off Christmas, and the cheap lout offers will offer the British punter the opportunity to stock up before the New Year VAT rise.

Can cooking lager claim to be the national drink of Britain if it falls to those depths of only being 4/5 of beer necked?

There is hope on the horizon though. With volumes of pong static, but value up, it seems the growth isn’t actual people drinking more pong but those drinkers being stung more money for their unusual and frankly odd habit of going into and drinking in pubs.

Considering the consensus view that pong isn’t expensive enough, and ought to be dearer to encourage more people to drink it, reversing most established economic theory regarding supply and demand we will have to wait and see whether pong “value” continues to grow.

My thoughts? Google what the average wage is in the country. I can make no claim to be particularly poor, just as tight as a knats chuff. 2 adults, 2 wages, no kids. I like cheap lout because I like to keep my money and not give it to others, but there are, I gather, those that drink cheap because its that choice or not drinking.

Beer ought to be cheaper. All beer. Make it the maximum.

11 comments:

HardKnott Dave said...

I think what the report really shows is that people will pay as much in a pub for good quality pong as they would for lager, that's all.

Of course, as has been commented elsewhere, good quality is the key, a problem I admit that dogs the cask market.

Tandleman said...

And that's the point. You can't charge what you like if the beer is crap.

Cooking Lager said...

Even the old timers on a pension that remember when a pint was 3 and 6 harpenny bob shilling farthings (whatever that is) ?

I see 'em all in the Spoons necking bitter at £1.50 a pint, and steering well clear of multi ale trendy £3-4 a pint haunts.

But if you say beer needs to be more expensive, and people would neck more, I'll take your word for it.

However as a high unit cost micro producer, albeit a nice chap I quite like, I can't help but think you have another motive for higher priced grog?

Cooking Lager said...

You can't really charge what you like if the beer is good, Tand. Not in a functioning market. You can charge what the market supports, and no more.

Barm said...

Looked at another way, perhaps pong is already so expensive that pong drinkers find it difficult to believe that other people pay even more for a pint of lout.

Curmudgeon said...

But very often people will be happily paying £3 a pint for rare beers almost right next door to Spoons - both have their place and cater for different market segments. And even in Spoons plenty will be paying £2 for guest beers rather than £1.50 for Ruddles.

Montague said...

I am currently working with an independent film maker who already has one film under his belt. I am eager to make a film called Beer Bloggers: The Movie, much in the style of the film Beer Tickers. The Budget will be under $20,000 and I will want to interview Cookie, Bell, Tandleman, Pattinson, Avery, Dredgie, WoolPack Dave, and some of the other freaks who contribute to this nonsense. We'll see.......

DJ said...

People will always look to get the best price for their purchase but if they feel they are getting a product of superior quality or rarity they are willing to pay a premium. People want value for money and good ale offers this even if on the face of it, it looks expensive.

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Beer Sagas said...

And here in Norway we would love to pay less than the equivalent of 7 GBP for a pint of beer...

Cooking Lager said...

It begs the question, fella, why live in Norway?

The lasses there must be top notch.

Beer Sagas said...

The girls are a big reason for staying here. Why emigrate while you can see eyecandy both in town and the neighbourhood?

But the beer prices are an abomination.