An artisanally crafted blog curated by Cooking Lager for discerning readers of beer bloggery

Tuesday, 9 March 2010

King of Beers

Today I’m blogging about a very special beer in the world of Cooking lager. One beer sits alongside the eponymous Carling as the representation of all that the Pongy Ale enthusiasts dislike. It is disliked so much you’ll see it referred to by its amusing nickname “Dudweiser”. You’ve guessed it, it’s a bottle of Bud, or Budweiser to give it its due respect. Not that fake Czech Republic muck that parades itself as Budweiser, but the genuine article. American Bud. Brewed under contract in the EU of course., and the famous beer that replaced Coors in Smokey and the Bandit II. (Coors featured in the first, in the second Burt drank Bud)

Wiki has this beer as a 4.2% Pale lager, in the UK it’s brewed to 5%, and a fascinating bit of wiki it is too. Brewed from the choicest hops, rice and barley malt and aged in Beachwood. They are unaware of any beer that costs so much to make and believe that the best beer ought to be fresh and inform you of the date the beer was born. The general view of most of the beer world is that this beer is bland muck. Nothing could be further from the truth. That’s why I dedicate this post to my top mate Dicky English, a big fan of Dudweiser (though he would never say) I’m sure. (The personal abuse on the forum was referring to Ricky as Dicky as he didn’t like being called Ricky. Please don’t think for a moment that it was actually personal abuse, I’m not one for calling people rude names, especially not a top geezer like Dicky. Respect dude!)

The most distinct tasting note that comes from this beer is sweetness. An odd sucrose sweetness rather than a maltose of unfermented caramelised malt that may exist in a darker beer, or even a fructose which you can find from time to time in even the expensive grog others like to neck. Odd thing for a beer. Now I cannot say whether it is sweetened or not, but the first bottle is undeniably sweet. Not unpleasantly so, but enough to not fit in with my expectation of what lout ought to be. Now I poured the first one into a glass. A 1990 Middlesbrough CAMRA beer festival glass to appeal to any CAMRA members that read this tosh and as a gesture of beer brotherhood and sincere friendship. The glass was nicked, but that doesn’t alter the sentiment. I wanted to look at its colour as I was told that the main reason Bud was marketed as a bottled beer in the UK was that trials as a draught product informed the brewer that the UK punter was put off by its “piss like appearance” of light yellow. I cannot say it put me off, nor did it appear greatly different than any other lout flogged. Maybe that’s an urban myth, who’s to say?

Further bottles revelled dryness as my mouth became accustomed to the sweetness and the beer took on a more conventional appeal. I was never one for Bud; though a lover of lout it was never my cup of tea. This cheap six pack changed my mind in regard to Bud. I enjoyed it and enjoyed it tremendously. Nowt wrong with the grog. Whether 30% rice or not, its top lout. I eat Rice Krispies, so there is nothing wrong with rice. It’s a commodity grain like any other and if Inbev want to flog me dirt cheap Bud they are very welcome. More power to them and less power to those that dislike Bud. To slag off Bud is not to insult this fine beer but to insult the millions that drink and enjoy it worldwide, all of which I’m sure are discerning people. It’s a nice bottle of grog, top marks.

12 comments:

Curmudgeon said...

The US measures alcohol content by weight - as alcohol is lighter than water, 4.2% alcohol by weight is the same as 5.0% by volume.

It's still the acme of blandness, though - but I suppose that's the point.

Velky Al said...

I am sure this is complete and utter heresy in the beer geek world, but I am not convinced that Budweiser is really all that bad.

Several friends and friends of friends over here find it hilarious to get me to drink beers like Budweiser, Miller and Coors just to get my reaction, and to be perfectly honest, I have had far worse pale lagers - Staropramen 10 degree springs immediately to mind.

Cooking Lager said...

Interesting stuff, Mudgie. Measuring by weight means it doesn't look nearly as bad. We should measure by weight and get less pissed and have fewer alcohol problems in society.

Good to see you enjoying the odd loout, Velky. Keep it up.

The Beer Nut said...

I'm reliably informed that the beechwood takes the form of sawdust and that "aging" lasts about three days. It's a means of clearing the beer rather than a flavouring technique, 'pparently.

And the version made by Diageo in Ireland is a mere 4.3%, though it does come in aluminium bottle-shaped cans at -5°C. Beat that!

Whorst said...

Fucking hilarious!! I see you've had it out with Richard English!! What an absolute dick that man is. I've unleashed a furry on him on many a US home brewing forum. You make me proud!

Sid Boggle said...

A number of years ago Garrett Oliver described what he'd seen following a visit to one of the Bud factories in the US - might have been the one near Newark airport.

I wish I'd made a note of his views, but I'm sure he never said anything about actual 'hops'...

Jeff Renner said...

The Wikipedia entry specifically says 4.2% abv, which shows you can't believe everything you read there. I'm looking at a US label right now. It is definitely 5% abv, which is about to 3.9% abw.

jesusjohn said...

Given yourself away a bit with that Middlesborough CAMRA Festival glass, eh Cookie?

Not averse to the occasional pongy ale, it would seem...

jesusjohn said...

My 'quite tasty' wife even went as far as to say:

'He didn't even get his deposit back. He kept the glass...'

No-ones buying the nicked glass theory.

You'll be telling us there was a grassy knoll next.

Mark, Real-Ale-Reviews.com said...

As lout goes Bud is one of my least favourite. Since I tried Lucky I've decided unanimously that it's to with the rice. Give me Carlsberg Export and Becks Vier before Bud any day.

Tyson said...

Ah, Tricky Dicky. Once upon a time, I hoped he was an Alan Partridge parody. But, sadly, he's not...

Paul Garrard said...

Are you not concerned that now being associated with Inbev the ‘Bud’ you eulogise might take on an air of sophistication, thus enticing those further up the food chain to dip their proverbial toe into this example of manufacturing excellence?