An artisanally crafted blog curated by Cooking Lager for discerning readers of beer bloggery

Friday, 11 September 2009

I knight thee Sir Galahad


One of the most exciting things about beer is the wide variety of new beers and innovation hitting the market place on a seemingly daily basis. Cooking lager enthusiasts and aficionado’s enjoy this pleasure too, but at a fraction of the price. There is nothing more exciting that wandering into a shop you’ve never been in before and discovering a cheap none brand of generic cooking lager you’ve never drank before being sold for buttons and realising you can sit in front of the telly watching celebs ballroom dancing and getting pissed up for next to nowt. These types of cooking lager are none brands. Brands you’ve never heard of, often with a ludicrous name that attempt to hint at some none existent provenance or mark of quality. It’s really superb stuff. If you can neck regular cooking lagers like Carling you’ll have no problem with it, and learn to enjoy its industrial slightly chemical corn syrup in a can ambiance.

This weekend I shall be necking Galahad lager. A name that conjures up imagery of Round table, King Arthur and ancient brewing expertise. The name matters little; it could be Skandia or even Skoda lager for all I care. It’s cheap. It’s 4%. It’s neckable. It’s cheap. Oh I’ve said that but yes it’s cheap. 12 can’s for a £5 at Aldi a week or so back when I bought it. Currently a few pence dearer at £7.99 for 18, here, but this is an old faithful for those in-between times if you are waiting for the next supermarket offer on the regular branded pisswater.

Galahad Lager is brewed in the Netherlands, by "United Dutch Breweries" in Breda, NL, known for Oranjeboom and Breda Lager, now part of InBev. Several field agents have died for this piece of information, but years of intelligence have borne fruit. I'd long wondered who brewed it. According to Wiki the Breda brewery was shut and shifted to Dommelsche Bierbrouwerij is a brewery in Dommelen - although this is not clear if you look through the United Dutch website here

What’s it like? Nectar is what it’s like. Ice cold and fizzy. Makes you belch if you neck it too quickly and leaves a lagery taste in the mouth that’s best washed down with another swig. With beer like this in the world sold for buttons it makes you glad to be alive, glad it’s the weekend and glad you are a free born Englishman.

5 comments:

John Clarke said...

Cookie,

You know what - I think that in reality not a drop of this stuff will pass your lips. Downloading a PR photo of the product is all well and good but we both know that you won't be actually buying the stuff, don't we?

Tandleman said...

Twelve cans? Nearly two weeks worth!

And isn't the expression "non brand"?

Cooking Lager said...

There are plenty of photo's on the blog of delicious and refreshing cooking lager poured and ready for drinking. I am preparing a video blog and may use this lout within it, just for you John. Is it so beyond comprehension that in the wide diversity of human appreciation, there exists a humble cooking lager enthusiast? Must all beer fans be bearded ale jihadists, John, that drink in dumpy pubs whilst throwing good money away? Join me, John boy, for a can of lout. Cast aside your beard, tatty jumper and plastic bag.

John Clarke said...

Now Cookie, you don't fool me. Anyone get blag the odd can or bottle of lager for photographic purposes. You are right when you say that there do exist humble cooking lager enthusiasts but as we have all twigged now - you aren't among them. I'll give you credit for maintaining the facade so doggedly though. And as I've said before no beards here (or tatty jumpers and plastic bags for that matter).

Diddle said...

Yeah, but you've got to give him credit for the picture of the norks though.